ESG Compliance

What is ESG

ESG, which stands for Environmental, Social, and Governance, has emerged as a set of practices that organizations implement to limit negative impact or enhance positive impact on society and governance bodies.

The environmental component focuses on aspects such as emissions, resource use, and water stewardship.

The social component encompasses diversity, labor practices, and community relations.

The governance component involves executive pay, audits, internal controls, and shareholder rights.

Additionally, ESG reporting can help companies mitigate risk through training and creation of risk and performance measures and ensure a centralised ESG data and reporting system, which has the benefit of greatly facilitating ESG monitoring, increasing reporting accuracy, transparency, and efficiency.





ESG reporting can offer several benefits to businesses, including attracting investors and lenders, offering a competitive advantage, making company operations sustainable, improving the company's reputation and business ethics, and preparing the company for regulatory checks and avoiding interventions.


REPORTING

WHY to become
ESG compliant and HOW?

ESG reporting is becoming increasingly important as it helps companies and stakeholders track and assess their sustainability and social responsibility efforts.  To achieve ESG compliance, companies can utilize various reporting frameworks such as the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB), the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), and the Environmental, Social, and Governance Reporting Standard (ESRS). These frameworks provide a structured approach to evaluating a company's practices and ESG-related performance, covering aspects such as environmental impact, social practices, and governance.

By aligning with these reporting frameworks, companies can effectively disclose their ESG performance and meet the growing demand for transparent and standardized ESG reporting.

Frameworks

GRI - Global Reporting Initiative

The GRI is a widely recognized ESG reporting framework that provides guidelines for companies to report on their sustainability performance. It focuses on economic, environmental, and social aspects and is characterized by its detailed and comprehensive reporting standards.

WHO needs to
report?

Companies around the world, both large and small, often use GRI guidelines to report on their ESG performance. While it's not mandatory, many organizations voluntarily adopt GRI to enhance their transparency.

WHEN does the company need to report

The timing of reporting can vary but is typically annual. Companies may also choose to report more frequently for real-time transparency.

WHAT needs to be reported?

GRI reporting covers a wide range of indicators, including emissions, labor practices, human rights, and community engagement, among others. The framework promotes transparency in reporting and the use of standardized metrics.

WHAT are the exceptions of reporting?

There are no specific exceptions within the GRI framework. However, companies can choose which aspects of their performance to disclose, but this may impact their credibility in the eyes of stakeholders.

WHAT are the penalties for reporting wrong or not reporting?

There are no legal penalties for not reporting or reporting inaccurately under GRI. However, companies risk reputational damage and a loss of investor trust if their disclosures are misleading.

ESRS and its Relation to CSRD

The ESRS, or European Single Reporting System, is an ESG reporting framework that has gained prominence within the European Union (EU). It closely relates to the Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive (CSRD), a significant regulatory development in the region. The ESRS provides a common reporting format aligned with CSRD requirements, making it easier for companies to comply.

WHO needs to report?

The CSRD mandates sustainability reporting for large companies and all public-interest entities operating within the EU. While smaller entities are exempted from the CSRD, for the moment, they may still voluntarily choose to use the ESRS for reporting until it will become mandatory for all companies.

WHEN does the company need to report

The CSRD mandates sustainability reporting for large companies and all public-interest entities operating within the EU. While smaller entities are exempted from the CSRD, for the moment, they may still voluntarily choose to use the ESRS for reporting until it will become mandatory for all companies.

WHAT needs to be reported?

Under the CSRD, companies must disclose a wide range of ESG information, including climate change, environmental, and social aspects. The ESRS, by extension, is designed to capture this required information in a standardized format.

WHAT are the exceptions of reporting?

The CSRD defines clear thresholds for reporting, exempting smaller companies. However, the ESRS focuses on harmonizing reporting standards for those within the CSRD's purview.

WHAT are the penalties for reporting wrong or not reporting?

Penalties for non-compliance with CSRD can include fines and legal consequences as specified by EU member states. Accurate reporting is essential to maintain transparency and regulatory compliance, and inaccuracies may lead to reputational damage and legal action.

Other Reporting Frameworks

SASB - Sustainability Accounting Standards Board

SASB provides industry-specific standards to help companies disclose financially material ESG information in their financial filings. SASB reporting is typically aligned with financial reporting cycles and requires companies to report on ESG topics that are financially material to their industry, focusing on risks and opportunities. False or misleading disclosures can lead to legal and regulatory consequences, including fines and litigation.

IFRS - International Financial Reporting Standards

IFRS is a global accounting framework that primarily focuses on financial reporting.
IFRS is primarily used by publicly traded companies worldwide, and ESG integration is voluntary at this stage. While IFRS primarily addresses financial information, companies may choose to include ESG information if it is considered financially material.

Why to comply?

ESG reporting is a critical aspect of a company's sustainability and social responsibility efforts. While there are no specific legal penalties for all cases, the consequences of inaccurate reporting or non-disclosure can be severe, including reputational damage and financial repercussions.

Companies should carefully consider which framework aligns with their goals, stakeholders, and regulatory requirements to ensure transparent and accurate ESG reporting.